Tag Archives: food in films

Friday Food in Film Clips: The 1980s Menacing Male Edition

10 Feb

In homage to Friday, and weekend movie-goers everywhere, I will be publishing monthly short and sweet posts on my favorite food scenes from movie and television. I’ll also continue to post my longer Food in Film reviews.

The Friday clips series came to me as a result of a weekly giveaway question that I posed on America’s Test Kitchen Feed. I was so entertained by the diversity of responses we received, that I thought, why not put this on Tortefeaster’s regular rotation?

To kick things off, I am going to start with scenes from classic 1980s films that I count as two of my absolute favorites.  These are both films that I have watched countless times; no matter what I’m doing, if I turn on the television and they happen to be on, I’ll usually stop mid-task and start watching intently.

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Food in Films: Three Stars

30 Dec

Un, deux, trois étoiles. The (in)famous Michelin Guide with its opaque network of inspectors can give its starry blessings, and it can just as easily take them away.

Lutz Hachmeister’s documentary Three Stars underscores this message nicely through an assemblage of interviews with nine very different chefs who achieved the honor–and some would say the curse–of a three star rating. Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts has been screening the documentary, along with El Bulli: Cooking in Progress, for the last two weeks. This evening is the last screening for both films.

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Food in Films: El Bulli

24 Dec

What would it be like to be a fly on the wall of the now-shuttered El Bulli, previously renowned as the World’s Greatest Restaurant? The trailer for the documentary El Bulli: Cooking in Progress, offers an enticing glimpse into this world of privilege.

As culinary maestro Ferran Adria explains, an avant-garde dining experience should be more than just about delicious food–he strives for a deep emotional response. The reaction he wants from patrons after eating one of his highly conceptualized works of food art? He wants them to think, “Killer!”

Unfortunately, attending a screening of Cooking in Progress was as far from “killer” as one gets.

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